2017 Annual Conference of the 

Society of Ecological Restoration –

Southwest Chapter

  

December 6-8, 2017

Hotel Albuquerque

Albuquerque, New Mexico

 

SER-SW 2017 Annual Conference Program

Check out PHOTOS  from the SER-SW 2017 Annual Conference

 

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS WHO MADE THIS EVENT POSSIBLE

 

 


Presentations 

 

FEATURED SPEAKERS:

US Forest Service Southwest Regional Restoration Program

John Waconda

 

How do we map Restoration Ecology onto a rapidly changing world?

Don Falk

 

 

PLENARY SESSIONS:

Native Plants and Partnerships Through the Border: Networking and Expanding Capacity in Mexico

Claverie

 

Mojave Desert Native Plant Program: Putting the Right Seed in the Right Place through Implementation of the National Seed Strategy in the Mojave Desert Ecoregion

Perkins

 

Trends in vegetation recover after land treatments in the SW United States: associations between environmental variables, ground-based measurements, and satellite greenness patterns

Copeland

 

Current Distribution and Anticipated Impacts of the Tamarisk Beetle (Diorhabda spp.) Across the Southwest

Bloodworth

 

The Changing Landscape of the Manzano Mountains Following Four Large Wildfires

Stropki

 

SER Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner Program and other SER Updates

Walder

 

 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Topic: Drylands Restoration

Suggested Practices for Biological Soil Crust conservation and Management in the Arid Southwestern United States

Bengston

 

Soil Health and Erosion Control

Kerby

 

Upland Restoration to Enhance Recovery Efforts for and Endangered Pupfish

Gold

 

Comparison of trailside degradation across a gradient of trail use in the Sonoran Desert

H. Rowe

 

Vegetation Recovery along Transmission Power Line Corridors in the Colorado Desert of Southern California

Prabhu

 

Topic: Riparian Restoration

Ecological Success Criteria for Riparian Habitat in the Colorado River Corridor in Mexico

Schlatter

 

UAV photogrammetry modeling of the Rio Grande silvery minnow habitat restoration project in Albuquerque, New Mexico: geomorphological, inundation, and vegetation changes over time

Whitehead

 

Habitat Restoration and management of Native and Non-native Trees in Southwestern Riparian Ecosystems

Volke

 

Process for Expanding Nursery Habitat for the Federally Endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow along a 31-Mile Reach of the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico

Caplan

 

Upper Gila River Restoration

Bove

 

Topic: Seeding and Plant Materials

Exotic root-rotting Phytophthora species detected in restoration plantings and nursery stock

VinZant

 

Building a Southwest Seed Partnership: a public-private initiative to supply native plant materials to southwestern restoration projects

Stone

 

Testing the efficacy of ripping, seeding, and seed band applications for restoring impacted soils in the Sonoran Desert

H. Rowe

 

Direct Seeding and Seedling Production as a Tool for Restoring Riparian Habitats

Bunting

 

Seeding vs natural recruitment: comparing semi-arid vegetation communities post reclamation

 

Farrell

 

Topic: Assessment and Monitoring

Environmental monitoring for the Rio del Norte Trail restoration project, Albuquerque, NM

Lightfoot

 

The value of site assessments to inform restoration design and planning- A case study at Arlington Wildlife Area In-Lieu Free Mitigation Site in Arizona

Banerjee

 

Hydrologic Monitoring pre-Grade control Structure Installations, heard Scout Pueblo, Phoenix, Arizona

Tosline

 

Northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) effects on established tamarisk-feeding invertebrate populations along the Las Vegas Wash, Clark County, Nevada

Eckberg

 

The economics of buffelgrass control

J. Rowe

 

Topic: Restoration and Conservation

Integrating Ecologies & Economies: The Borderland Restoration Network

Kurt Vaughn

 

Plant functional traits and local climate conditions determine restoration success and failure on the Colorado Plateau

Balazs

 

Local youth Take Charge of Restoring Border Ecosystems: Borderland Earth Care Youth Institute Looks Forward

Christopher

 

Restoration as an Embodied Arts Practice: Engaging Communities in Land Stewardship

McNellis

 

Cowboy Restoration: Wrangling Springsnails, Mules and the Elements

Plath

 

Bioretention ponds, Acacias, Swales, Arroyos and other little appreciated “Natural Areas” as a Source of Restoration and Education

DePew

 

Golf course closures in the SW United States: Opportunities for conservation

Cederberg

 

Topic: A Changing Climate

Creating Restoration Planting Palettes to Support Pollinators in a Changing Climate

Campbell

 

Habitat patches support rich and abundant resident pollinator communities to minimize use of restoration resources in arid lands

McCormick

 

Climate Landscape Response (CLaRe) phenometrics for southern AZ and CA using Prism and MODIS data and leveraging the PICO

Devesh

 

 

Field Trips:

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is a world-class museum and cultural center created as a place where Pueblo people can tell their story. As the gateway to the 19 Pueblos of New Mexico, the IPCC is a necessary first stop for visitors to New Mexico, providing an introduction for understanding the state’s landscape, legacy, and story of continuance. Known for its collection of Pueblo pottery and murals painted by Pueblo artists, the IPCC also offers an exciting schedule of cultural, educational, and community activities.

 

Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program

The Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program (BEMP) strives to be an essential resource for managers of the Rio Grande and its riverside forest, the bosque.  Across 31 active monitoring sites along over 300 miles of river, BEMP deploys thousands of K-12 students to not only gather key field data to determine the success of different interventions but also builds connections between students and their watershed. This field trip will include an orientation of BEMP, how citizen science can be used to monitor restoration projects, lessons learned, and planning and budgeting for citizen science support.

 

Santa Ana Pueblo Native Plant Nursery

The Santa Ana Native Plant and Tree Nursery provides over 250 species of low-water use plant materials, including herbaceous perennials, annuals and biennials; herbs, grasses, trees, shrubs and vines; and vegetable transplants. The nursery is located 2 miles north of Bernalillo, and this field trip will include a behind the scenes tour with nursery staff.

 

Note: Field trips were covered by conference registration fee!